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Maya and The Book of Everything

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I was really looking forward to reading Maya and The Book of Everything by Laurie Graves in a way I hadn’t looked forward to reading a fiction book in a long time. Even though it’s a young adult fantasy novel and a gift to my 13-year-old daughter, something about the plot caught my attention. The cover art charmed me also and I ended up reading it before she did.

The story begins in modern times America (coincidentally the same area where I grew up) and it centres around the young heroine Maya and the magical secret Book of Everything. In fulfilling her destiny to protect the book from an evil syndicate that would like to control and alter its purpose, she travels through time and space encountering dangerous situations and tough decisions at every turn. Many other compelling characters are superbly developed and give much to the plot which twists and weaves into such an intriguing storyline, I found it hard to put down. Talking books, a royal toad, a magic forest and Shakespearean references are just a few of the books creative highlights for me. The story grips you right out of the gate and continues straight through to the last page. In fact, the ending caught me by surprise as much as it did Maya and gave me the thought ‘this could easily be a movie’.

Ms Graves has a unique trait to her writing where she summarises some of the happenings in the book by way of revealing a comment or action to be carried out at a future time. She accomplishes this with the introductory phrase, ‘Later he would say…’, cleverly adding depth to the characters as well as the reader’s understanding of the bigger picture, all in a single sentence.

Even though the main character is a young adult, I believe the story would have appeal far beyond that age group. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and eagerly await Book 2 in The Great Library Series.

My daughter Margaret Maeve is a bit uncertain about writing her own book review for Maya and The Book of Everything. I was thinking I could interview her, asking some questions that would draw the review out of her and then publish it here in a Q&A format. What do you think? So I’m asking you, my dear readers, so please give me some suggestions about what questions I might ask her. All ideas will be thoughtfully considered!

Maya and The Book of Everything can be purchased from the following:

Order directly from Hinterland Press
Maya and the Book of Everything
$14.95 Quality Paperback

Get Maya and the Book of Everything from Amazon.com
$14.95 Quality Paperback
or $3.99 Kindle e-book

Get Maya and the Book of Everything
from Barnes & Nobel
$14.99 Quality Paperback

Get Maya and the Book of Everything
from Amazon.co.uk
£12.20 Quality Paperback

Have a look at Laurie Graves blog, Notes From the Hinterland, or her Facebook page, where she expresses her creativity through her writings about “nature, home, community, books, writing, the environment, food, and rural life”.

Guest #Book #Review by @TheAranArtisan of Dancing to an Irish Reel by @CFullerton3

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I’m very grateful for the opportunity to share my book review on Lit World Interviews.”

Lit World Interviews

Melissa Gillan Review of Dancing to an Irish Reel

Dancing to an Irish Reel by Claire Fullerton – A book review

Dancing to an Irish Reel by Claire FullertonOh to be twenty-something again, but this time with the same intuitive sensibility as Hailey Crossan, the heroine of this fictional story.

That thought crossed my mind many times while reading Claire Fullerton’s novel, Dancing to an Irish Reel. I had the pre-decided notion that I would relate personally to Hailey’s experience being that, like her, I’m an American woman involved with an Irish gentleman. Relate I did, but not where I expected to. Our relationships are as different as our personalities and the same goes for the men in our lives. So I reread the book with no expectation or comparison and it won my heart over.

What I most connected with were the references to western Ireland geography, weather, language, and societal mores — they are impeccable. I could nearly hear the distinct Connemara blas…

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